David Hamilton Golland, Ph.D.






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  • Governors State University
    College of Arts and Sciences, Divison of Arts & Letters, Humanities Unit

    HISTORY of the UNITED STATES to 1865
    HIST 1110, Fall, 2020

    Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, this course will be held online, asynchronously, through BlackBoard.

    Section 01
    Dr. David Golland

    Virtual Office Hours: Click HERE
    Sections 02, 04
    Dr. Eliot Fackler

    Virtual Office Hours: TBA




    Online Course Guide


    Course Description:
    Provides a historical examination of the United States from the founding of the colonies through Reconstruction with special emphasis on connections between historical transformations and issues of race, class, gender, religion, nation-building, economic development and modernization, and the sectional conflict.
    Rationale: Familiarity with the historical developments in the United States is critical to a nuanced and complex understanding of the United States and it's place in the world today.
    Intended Audience: This is a required course for history majors and fills a requirement for Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education, and Social Science majors. This course also meets the Humanities General Education requirement.
    Course Modality: Lecture/Discussion

    General Education (GenEd) Information: Students must complete this course with a grade of C or better in order to receive General Education Credit towards graduation. Students who earn a grade of D will receive elective credit towards graduation but will not receive GenEd credit; to complete the GenEd requirement they may either repeat the course for a better grade, or take another appropriate GenEd course. Students who earn a grade of F (or who withdraw from the course without a grade) must repeat the course and earn a C or better to fulfill the GenEd requirement.


    Expected Student Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Identify the major areas of British colonization in North America and distinguish between them on politics, economics, and society
  • Identify the different perspectives on the major events in U.S. history prior to the Civil War
  • Explain the basic chronology of the major events in U.S. history prior to the Civil War
  • Identify primary and secondary sources


    Required Textbook: (Top)

    The American Yawp
    A Free and Online, Collaboratively Built American History Textbook

    Click to access.
     

    The American Yawp Reader
    A Documentary Companion to the American Yawp

    Click to access.



    Course Components and Grade Weighting: (Top)
    There are six components to this course:
    Component Weight
    Class Participation 30%
    Primary Source Analyses (6 at 5% each) 30%
    Culminating Assignments (8 at 5% each) 40%
    Total 100%


    Grading:
    The mathematical score for students will translate into letter grades as follows:
    A+ ≥98
    A ≥93 & <98
    A- ≥90 & <93
    B+ ≥88 & <90
    B ≥83 & <88
    B- ≥80 & <83
    C+ ≥78 & <80
    C ≥73 & <78
    C- ≥70 & <73
    D+ ≥68 & <70
    D ≥63 & <68
    D- ≥60 & <63
    F <60


    All students will receive the exact grade they have earned, and grades will NOT be rounded up. For example, a student with a mathematical score of 89.999 will receive a B+; a student with a mathematical score of 59.999 will receive an F. Students in danger of receiving an F are advised to withdraw from the course prior to the withdrawal deadline.


    Primary Source Rubric
    For each module, students will be asked to engage with and analyze primary sources. Use the following rubric for these assignments:
    Sourcing
    1) Who created the artifact/source?

    2) What kind of source is it?

    3) When and where was it created?

    4) For what audience was the source created? (if applicable)

    5) What is the significance of these pieces of information?
    Observation
    1) Summarize the content of the source in one sentence

    2) What pieces of evidence support/verify that summary?

    3) What do we learn about life in this time from this source?
    Contextualization
    1) What connections can you draw between the source and other things you’ve studied/learned about?

    2) How does this new information help you understand the perspective(s) in this source, why it was created, and its significance to our understanding of this time and place?

    3) What questions do you still have that would help you understand this source/artifact better?
    Corroboration
    1) What do other sources say? Do they agree or disagree with this source?

    2) After examining other sources, what are the perspectives/biases of this source?

    3) Why was the source created, what is its historical significance, and what does it tell us about the past?

    4) What additional evidence (primary or secondary) would help you answer your questions? Where would you go next?



    Class Meetings: (Top)
    This class will be held asynchronously (meaning all students work independently and do not meet at the regular class time) but will meet in person via Zoom three times: during the first week, during the mid-term week, and during the final week. All three meetings will be from 10:00 to 11:15am.
    In Person Meeting Dates:
  • Tuesday, September 1
  • Tuesday, October 13
  • Thursday, Dectember 10
    The Zoom Login information will be in BlackBoard. Please use a computer with a camera and microphone when we meet.


    Module 1:
    The Work of Historical Inquiry
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    August 31-September 6
    What is history?

    What is American history?

    Why study history?

    How is history relevant to our lives today?
  • Logan Jaffe, "Four Perspectives on the Christopher Columbus Statues," ProPublica Illinois, July 31, 2020

  • Gabriela Angeleti, "As Monuments to Christopher Columbus come down across the US, Italian-Americans Campaign to Protect a Symbol of 'Cultural Heritage,'" The Art Newspaper, August 13, 2020

  • Yawp reader: Journal of Christopher Columbus
  • Introduction

    Ch. 1
    Introductory Zoom discussion with Drs. Golland and Fackler, 9/1
    >Login through BlackBoard
    Culminating Assignment:
    Christopher Columbus and historical memory.
    All students must participate in the discussion with at least two substantive contributions. The first post on the discussion thread may respond directly to the prompt provided by the professor or to fellow students' initial posts. This post must be submitted no later than 11:59pm on September 2. The second contribution should respond to the ongoing conversation, and must be submitted by 11:59pm on September 5.
    Module 2:
    Columbian Exchanges
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    September 7-13
    What is the Columbian Exchange?

    What were/are its main consequences?

    Is early American history best understood as a history of contact or a history of conquest?
  • Bartolomé de Las Casas Describes the Exploitation of Indigenous Peoples, 1542

  • Richard Hakluyt Makes the Case for English Colonization, 1584

  • A Gaspesian Man Defends his Way of Life, 1641

  • Florentine Codex on Smallpox

  • George Catlin, "Comanche Feats of Horsemanship"
  • Ch. 2 Fackler, "The Columbian Exchange and Ecological Imperialism"
    >In BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Choose one of the written primary sources assigned in this module and complete parts 1, 2, and 3 of the Primary Source Analysis Rubric for that document (note: you may need to do a bit of basic research to answer questions 1 and 3 in the "Sourcing" section). The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on September 9.
    September 14-20
    How were Native American, European, and West African cultures different? How were they similar?

    How did the interactions between the peoples of four continents shape life in North America during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

    What have been the long-term consequences of these interactions?
      Ch. 3 Golland, "Colonial Grid"
    >In BlackBoard

    The Scarlet Letter, 1995, Dir. Roland Joffe (Amazon Prime $3.99; Netflix DVD)
    Culminating Assignment:
    Complete the analysis of the primary source you chose last week by answering the questions from the "Corroboration" section of the Primary Source Analysis Rubric. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on September 16.
    Module 3:
    Slavery and the Making of Race
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    September 21-27
    How did the system of chattel slavery develop in the Americas?

    How common was unfree labor in colonial British North America?

    What is the difference between a society with slaves and a slave society?
  • Olaudah Equiano Describes the Middle Passage, 1789

  • Rose Davis is Sentenced to a Life of Slavery, 1715

  • Print of the Slave Ship Brookes, 1789

  • Casta Painting

  • Virginia Statutes (1660) Act LIV and Act XII
  •   Golland, "Societies with Slaves and Slave Societies"
    >In BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Complete the entire Primary Source Analysis Rubric for the Rose Davis document. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on September 23.
    September 28-October 4
    What is race?

    What is racism?

    Historically, how did the modern concept of race develop?

    What is the relationship between race and slavery?
      Ch. 4 Fackler, "Slavery and Racecraft"
    >Coming soon to BlackBoard
    Culminating Assignment:
    Module 3 Historical Interpretation:
    Using the primary sources from this module as evidence, answer the following questions:

    1. What do you believe is the relationship between slavery and the concept/ideology of race?

    2. Do the sources indicate that racism justified the practice of slavery? Or, rather, do the sources suggest that racism was the outcome or result of chattel slavery?

    Answer these questions in an essay of two pages or less (double-spaced Times New Roman font with one-inch margins) by drawing on direct evidence from the assigned primary sources to justify your argument. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on September 30.
    Module 4:
    American Revolutions
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    October 5-11
    What was the purpose of the American Revolution?

    Is the "American Revolution" the same thing as the "Revolutionary War?"
  • Thomas Paine Calls for American Independence, 1776

  • Declaration of Independence

  • Abigail and John Adams Converse on Women's Rights

  • A Confederation of Native peoples seek peace with the United States, 1786

  • Letter of Cato and Petition... 1781

  • Perspectives on the American Revolution by Benjamin Rush and John Adams
  • Ch. 5 Fackler, "Contagions of Liberty and the Limits of the Revolution"
    >Coming soon to BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Complete the entire Primary Source Analysis Rubric for the Letter of Cato and Petition document. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on October 7.
    October12-18
    How did life in British North America change from the early 1760s to the late 1780s?

    What effects did the revolutionary ideas of individual liberty and natural rights have on the people of the new United States?
      Ch. 6 Golland, "Revised Colonial Grid"
    >In BlackBoard
    Culminating Assignment:
    Module 4 Historical Interpretation:
    Using evidence from the primary sources assigned for this module, answer the following questions:

    1. How revolutionary was the American Revolution?

    2. Did the Revolution transform the lives of all Americans?

    3. Were most Americans' lives improved?

    Answer these questions in an essay of two pages or less (double-spaced Times New Roman font with one-inch margins) by drawing on direct evidence from the assigned primary sources to justify your argument. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on October 14.
    Module 5:
    Industrialization, Immigration, and Expansion
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    October 19-25
    What was the Market Revolution?

    What role did Andrew Jackson play in the Market Revolution?

    Did the Market Revolution lead to major social movements in this era, or vice-versa?

    Was there a sectional divide in the Market Revolution?
  • Blacksmith Apprentice Contract, 1836

  • A Traveler Describes Life Along the Erie Canal, 1829

  • Monroe Doctrine
  • Ch. 8 Midterm Zoom Discussion, 10/13
    >Login through BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Complete the entire Primary Source Analysis Rubric for one primary source in the current module. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on October 21.
    October 26-November 1
    How did the United States define "democracy" during the Jacksonian Era?

    How was democracy expressed other than voting?

    How would you define the political economy of the Jacksonian Era?
  • Andrew Jackson's Veto Message against Re-chartering the Bank of the United States, 1832
  • Ch. 9 Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America: An Animated Introduction Culminating Assignment:
    Using the de Tocqueville video and the readings for this module, compare and contrast the views of democracy as expressed by de Tocqueville on the one hand and the Jacksonians on the other, in an essay of two pages or less (double-spaced Times New Roman font with one-inch margins) by drawing on direct evidence from the assigned primary sources to justify your argument. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on October 28.
    November 3
    Election Day No Class      
    Module 6:
    Abolitionism
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    November 5-11
    What is the difference between abolitionism and anti-slavery sentiment?

    What were the moral arguments for and against slavery?

    What were the economic arguments for and against slavery?
  • David Walker's Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, 1829

  • William Lloyd Garrison Introduces the Liberator, 1831

  • Sarah Grimke Calls for Women's Rights, 1838

  • Calhoun, "On the Oregon Bill"
  • Ch. 10 Golland on abolitionism and anti-slavery advocacy
    >In BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Complete the entire Primary Source Analysis Rubric for one primary source in the current module. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on November 7.
    November 12-18
    How did abolitionists attempt to end slavery?

    What were the obstacles to abolitionism?

    How did the issue of slavery divide the United States geographically, and why?
  • Harriet Jacobs on Rape and Slavery, 1860

  • Solomon Northup Describes a Slave Market, 1841

  • George Fitzhugh Argues that Slavery is Better than Liberty and Equality, 1854
  • Ch. 11   Culminating Assignment:
    Based on the assigned primary sources for this module, why did so many people in the United States decide--against the trends of thousands of years of history--that slavery needed to end? Elaborate on the difference between economic opposition to slavery and moral opposition to slavery in an essay of two pages or less (double-spaced Times New Roman font with one-inch margins) by drawing on direct evidence from the assigned primary sources to justify your argument. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on November 14.
    Module 7:
    Sectionalism and The Civil War
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    November 19-25
    What role did the Mexican War play in deepening sectional tensions?

    Could the United States have avoided a civil war? How?

    What role did the political parties play in deepening sectional tensions?
  • Wilmot Proviso

  • Douglass, "What, to the Slave, is the 4th of July?"

  • Margaraetta Mason and Lydia Maria Child Discuss John Brown, 1860

  • U.S. Supreme Court, Dredd Scott v. Sanford

  • South Carolina Declaration of Secession, 1860
  • Ch. 13 Golland, "The Civil War in under Five Minutes"
    >In BlackBoard
    Primary Source Analysis:
    Complete the entire Primary Source Analysis Rubric for one primary source in the current module. The assignment must be submitted through Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on November 21.
    November 26
    Thanksgiving No Class      
    November 30-December 6
    Why did the southern states secede from the union?

    What was the role of African Americans in the Civil War?

    Is civil war possible in the United States today? Why or why not?
  • Alexander Stephens on Slavery and the Confederate Constitution, 1861

  • William Henry Singleton, a formerly enslaved man, recalls fighting for the Union, 1922

  • Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, 1865
  • Ch. 14 Lincoln, Dir. Steven Spielberg (Amazon Prime $3.99; Netflix DVD) Culminating Assignment:
    Based on the assigned primary sources for this module, why was the Civil War fought? Why is there controversy today around this topic? Answer these questions in an essay of two pages or less (double-spaced Times New Roman font with one-inch margins) by drawing on direct evidence from the assigned primary sources to justify your argument. Submit hrough Blackboard as a Microsoft Word document by 11:59pm on December 1.
    Module 8:
    Questions
    Primary Source Reading
    Textbook Reading
    Micro-Lecture
    Assignments
    December 7-13
    What were Presidential Reconstruction, Radical Reconstruction, and "Redemption?"

    What were the "Reconstruction Amendments?

    Was Reconstruction successful? Why or why not?

    How is the history of Reconstruction relevant to our lives today?
  • Charlotte Forten Teaches Freed Children in South Carolina

  • Mississippi Black Code

  • Frederick Douglass on Remembering the Civil War, 1877

  • Caroline Randall Williams, "You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument"

  • Charles M. Blow, "Yes, Even George Washington"

  • Reid J. Epstein, "A Liberal Town Built Around Confederate Generals Rethinks Its Identity"

  • Catie Edmondson, "House Votes to Remove Confederate Statues From U.S. Capitol"

  • "Putting Heroes, and Traitors, Where They Belong"

  • Natasha Trethewey, "Goodbye to a Symbol That Told Black Americans to 'Know Your Place'"
  • Ch. 15 Final Week Zoom Discussion with Drs. Golland and Fackler, 12/10
    >Login through BlackBoard
    Culminating Assignment:
    BlackBoard debate on Confederate monuments using the assigned news articles and other primary sources and textbook.



    Course Policies:
  • Deadlines. All assignments are expected to be submitted on time. Late assignments, which will carry a two-point penalty, must be turned in by 11:59pm on the Sunday concluding the module, otherwise they will receive a grade of zero.

  • Behavior. Students are expected to engage in discussions thoughtfuly, critically, and above all respectfully. This does NOT mean that we cannot disagree. Indeed, disagreement is a cornerstone to critical inquiry. In the spirit of true critique, we will engage in thoughtful, rigorous discussions of the challenging topics and themes that animate this course. Your instructor has a zero-tolerance policy for disruptive or disrespectful behavior. You will be treated like adults and are expected to behave like adults.

  • Progress Reports. You will receive feedback on your progress in this course in the form of returned and graded primary source analyses and culminating assignments. Pay close attention to the instructor comments to monitor your progress in each component of the course, and consider the value of each component to calculate your progress towards your final grade. Students who fully complete every synchronous do-now and actively participate in each class session can expect perfect scores for those components unless otherwise notified. Your instructor will not seek you out to discuss your progress but you are welcome to speak with him about it. Make an appointment to see him during his virtual office hours (see top of page).

  • Academic Honesty. Students are expected to fulfill academic requirements in an ethical and honest manner. This expectation pertains to the following: use and acknowledgement of the ideas and work of others, submission of work to fulfill course requirements, sharing of work with other students, and appropriate behavior during examinations. These ethical considerations are not intended to discourage people from studying together or from engaging in group projects. The university policy on academic honesty appears in the catalog appendix, which can be found on the website at http://catalog.govst.edu/content.php?catoid=1&navoid=37.

  • Wikipedia Research. It's more complicated than you think. Please read this article by Prof. Alan Liu of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

  • This is College. Congratulations on making it to college! Most people never attend college. You have earned your place here, and are now part of an elite group. Take pride in that, but remember that with this privilege come obligations. Your professors look forward to helping you meet those obligations so that you can graduate into the company of college-educated women and men, what we call the informed citizenry. This is especially important in this age of so-called "alternative facts" and "fake news." You will find college to be quite different than high school, for instance:
    >Homework is assigned in the syllabus and is to be completed before class. In high school, the teacher usually gave you the homework assignment at the end of each class. In college, all homework is listed on the syllabus, and is due before each class.
    >Homework pertains to the upcoming discussion, not the previous lesson. In high school, homework was a tool used to reinforce the previous lesson. In college, the purpose of homework is to prepare you for the upcoming class discussion. So if you don't do your homework, you will have difficulty following the class discussion.
    >Homework is the primary educational tool. In high school, homework was supplemental to the classroom. In college, the classroom is supplemental to the homework. You should expect to spend two hours doing homework for every one hour in the classroom. For a three-credit course, you will spend 2.5 hours in the classroom each week, so you should expect to average 5 hours per week on homework (including the readings and other activities). Some weeks you will spend more time, some less.
    >If you miss class, do NOT ask your professor "did I miss anything important?" Every class session and everything we do in a course is important. To ask this question is disrespectful of your work, the work of your fellow students, and your professor.
    >Your instructor is a working professional who has been highly successful in her/his profession (in this case the profession of history). In high school you had teachers, who (with rare exceptions) taught the work of others. In college you have professors who often spend twice as much time working in their professions as they do teaching. You have heard the phrase "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach." College professors do and teach. Mastery of an academic profession nearly always requires a doctoral degree, so address us as Professor or Doctor, not "Ms." or "Mr." (i.e. Professor Fackler or Doctor Fackler).
    >College is not about memorizing "facts." What we teach are critical thinking skills and the ability to analyze information to draw meaningful conclusions.
    >College is Rated R. You will not be treated like a child; nor will you be treated as if you were fragile. You will be introduced to ideas and themes which may make you uncomfortable. That is a good thing. Reality is sometimes not for the faint of heart. You should take advantage of your time here to step out of your comfort zone and consider alternate perspectives, especially those that scare you!

    Avoiding Plagiarism by Good Paraphrasing, Quoting and Documentation, By Prof. Timothy C. Gsell, Governors State University
    Give credit to your sources, because they deserve it. Many students inadvertently plagiarize the intellectual work of others, and run the risk of receiving an F. It is easy to plagiarize, especially with all the information on the web! Simply fail to give credit where credit is due, and you are a plagiarist. That is all there is to it. But how can one know when credit is due, you ask? Read this carefully:

    Document your source if you paraphrase or quote. Failure to do so is an act of plagiarism, even if it is innocent. It is easy to plagiarize even though one does not intend to steal another?s work. Therefore, it is very important to understand the essentials of paraphrasing and quoting discussed below.

    If in doubt, consult a handbook on good writing or contact me. I strongly recommend this if your are not sure about documenting written material. The following quotes are from the Prentice-Hall Handbook for Writers, 10th edition. Chapter 45 (The Research Paper). But there are other good handbooks with similar words of wisdom:
  • A paraphrase is a restatement of the source material in your own words, syntax, and style but preserving the tone of the original?. and of approximately the same length (not as summary). A paraphrase uses the original author?s idea and presents it in your own language. Since in paraphrasing you borrowing someone?s thoughts, you must document the source when you use the paraphrase in your paper (page 470).
  • A direct quotation records exactly the words of the original source (as well as the exact punctuation and even any spelling errors). Like summaries and paraphrases, direct quotations require citations in your paper crediting the source from which you copied them. In general, use direct quotations only for particularly telling phrases or for information that must be rendered exactly as you found it (page 470).
  • Plagiarism consists of passing off ideas, opinions, conclusions, facts, words (intellectual property) of another as your own. Plagiarism is dishonest and carries penalties not only in academic environments but in all professions, as well as copyright law (page 470).
  • Long word-for-word quotations are rarely appropriate to a paper or particularly to a lab report. Use of all or most of a single sentence or an apt figure of speech without acknowledgment from another source is also dishonest and considered plagiarism (page 470).
  • Even if you acknowledge the source in a citation, you are still plagiarizing when you incorporate in your work faultily paraphrased or summarized material from another author in which you follow almost exactly the original?s sentence patterns and phrasing. Paraphrasing and summarizing require that you fully digest an author?s ideas and interpretations and restate them in your own words. It is not enough simply to modify the original author?s sentences slightly, to change a word here and there (page 472).
  • A research report or paper loaded with quotations or consisting of long quotations stitched loosely together with brief comments will almost always be an unsatisfactory paper (page 474).
  • Make use of paraphrases and summaries instead of quotations in most cases where sources are cited. Frequently, the point can be made better in your own words, with proper citations, than in the words of the original (page 474)
    Take the plagiarism quiz now!


    Services (Top)
    Counseling Center: The Counseling Center of the Academic Resource Center at Governors State University (GSU) has a staff of experienced professionals who provide a variety of counseling services for GSU undergraduate and graduate students. The counselors support and adhere to the professional, ethical, and legal standards as described by the American Psychological Association, as well as other professional organizations. Our mission is to contribute to the overall quality of campus life for students, and to support the academic endeavors of our students. The Counseling Center is located in the Academic Resource Center, B1215. Office hours are Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. and Fridays 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. For personal counseling, contact Katherine Helm, 708.235.7334. For academic counseling, call 708.534.4508.

    Writing Center: In that writing is a fundamental part of this course, students are encouraged, but not required, to attend the Writing Center for assistance in completing writing assignments. In-depth individual assistance with research papers or any other writing for classes is available through the Writing Center. For one-on-one help, please call 708.534.4508 to make an appointment. On-site tutoring is available by appointment only. The Writing Center desk in the Library offers students the opportunity to ask questions dealing with the research assignments. You may submit a copy of your paper for revision suggestions, obtain information about virtual appointments, and find sources for help with research writing as well as sources for general writing help, including grammar resources.

    Disability Statement: (Top)
    GSU is committed to providing all students equal access to University programs and facilities. You may be eligible for academic accommodations if you have a documented physical, psychiatric (anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, AD/HD, post-traumatic stress, or others) or a neurological disability such as a learning disability, autism or TBI. You must register and provide documentation with Access Services for Students with Disabilities (ASSD) before faculty members are required to provide appropriate accommodations. For more information or to register, please contact ASSD at assd@govst.edu or 708-235-3968. To aid in creating an accessible learning environment for students with disabilities contact ASSD before or during the first week of classes.

    Title IX Statement:
    Consistent with GSU Policy 78, Title IX and Anti-Sex Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Policy, Title IX regulations make it clear that violence and harassment based on sex and gender is a Civil Rights offense subject to the same kinds of accountability and the same kinds of support applied to offenses against other protected categories, such as race, national origin, etc... The University has a duty to prevent harassment, post policies against it, to investigate complaints, and to take prompt action to stop harassment when it occurs. Contact the Governors State University Title IX Coordinator to report any incidents at titleixofficer@govst.edu 708.534-4100 and ask to speak to the Title IX Coordinator. For complete Title IX information and resources, visit: http://www.govst.edu/TitleIX/.

    Emergency Preparedness Statement:
    In case of emergency, the University's Alert System will be activated. Students are encouraged to maintain updated contact information using the link on the homepage of the myGSU portal. In addition, students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the Emergency Procedures posted in each classroom. Detailed information about the University's emergency management plan, information about how to update your contact information, and the Campus Safety Booklet can be found at http://www.govst.edu/emergency.

    Academic Honesty Statement:
    Students are expected to fulfill academic requirements in an ethical and honest manner. This expectation pertains to the following: use and acknowledgement of the ideas and work of others, submission of work to fulfill course requirements, sharing of work with other students, and appropriate behavior during examinations. These ethical considerations are not intended to discourage people from studying together or from engaging in group projects. The University policy on academic honesty appears in the catalog appendix, which can be found on the website at http://catalog.govst.edu/content.php?catoid=8&navoid=673#Academic_Honesty

    COVID-19 Statement
    At the opening of the fall term 2020, everyone on campus is required to wear face coverings. Students are required to follow the same directives as all people coming to the GSU campus. Signs detailing the face covering requirements are posted through-out the campus and must be followed. Any student who fails to follow required safety procedures including the posted procedures for COVID 19, or comply with university employee instructions are considered to be violating Student Conduct Rules (Policy 4 Student Conduct Policy) and is subject to disciplinary action which may include removal from a class, cancellation of a class or removal from campus. Updates related to COVID-19 and the most up to date safety information are available on the COVID updates and Fall 2020 Campus Operating Plan at https://www.govst.edu/emergency Students are encouraged to self-report symptoms or diagnosis of COVID-19 ( e.g. fever, cough, difficulty breathing) or close contact with someone who has a lab confirmed or presumptive COVID-19 diagnosis using the COVID-19 Reporting Form found on the COVID-19 webpage http://www.govst.edu/COVID-19-students. If you are ill or have symptoms, stay home, and notify your instructor so that appropriate course completion arrangements can be made. Students with disabilities who require accommodations should contact disability services at https://www.govst.edu/disability-services/. Students who are impacted by COVID 19 and need adjustment to class requirements, are responsible to send a written request to the instructor as soon as possible for approval.


    Links: (Top)
  • GSU Homepage
  • GSU Library
  • The New York Times Online
  • Amazon.Com
  • Google
  • Professor Golland's Website


    Photo Credit: "Am I not a Man and a Brother?" Exhibit: Stanford University; Online Location: http://www.stanford.edu/class/history29s/

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    Last Updated 15 September, 2020 (DHG)