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HIS 10-6205 Final Exam
Room Assignments:


Rm. CO-317, Prof. Roczniak
Cruz
Demesa-Rodriguez
Gonzalez
Jefferson
Jones
Mendoza
Veras

Rm. CO-213, Prof. Lang
Maldonado
Moran
Negron
Payamps
Rodriguez
Rojas-Nunez
Torres

Both exams will be held on Tuesday, May 25, at 8:00 p.m.

If you are a student in HIS 10-6205 and your name is not listed above, please e-mail me immediately at professor.golland@gmail.com to arrange to take the final.











HISTORY of the MODERN WORLD
ONLINE GUIDE

Professor David Hamilton Golland


Announcements and Emergency Information

May 12: The final exam information is posted below.

HIS 10 Section 6205
Tuesdays and Thursdays
8:15-9:30
CO-213

Final Exam:
Tuesday, May 25, 8:00 p.m. See left column for room assignments.
HIS 10 Section 6203W
Mondays and Wednesdays
8:15-9:30
CO-228

Final Exam:
Monday, May 24, 8:00 p.m.
CO-213
HIS 11 Section 2224
Mondays and Wednesdays
12:00-2:00
CO-317

Final Exam:
Friday, May 21, 10:00 a.m.
CO-615
HIS 11 Section 6207
Mondays and Wednesdays
6:00-7:50
CO-317

Final Exam:
Monday, May 24, 6:00 p.m.
CO-228
HIS 10 Section 8583
Saturdays
12:30-3:00
CO-330

Final Exam:
Saturday, May 22, 12:00 p.m.
CO-330


Online Course Guide
Please click HERE for the departmental syllabus for this course.

Jump To:
  • Description and Objectives
  • Required Texts
  • Tests
  • Quiz and Exam Rules
  • Essays (Writing-Intensive Section 6203W Only)
  • Grade Weighting
  • Classroom Etiquette
  • Absence Policy
  • Schedule of Assignments
  • Contact Information
  • Links


  • Description and Objectives:
    History of the Modern World (HIS 10, HIS 11) is a one-semester world history survey that covers significant political, social, and cultural currents of the last 300 years. Its purpose is to introduce you to the major forces and events of the recent past and analyze how these forces and events helped to create the world in which we live today. By exploring the interaction over time between world-historical themes such as industrialization, nationalism and imperialism, decolonization and neocolonialism, technology and warfare, by learning the differences between capitalism and socialism, and liberalism and authoritarianism, we expect that you will more fully comprehend the origins of the society in which we all live. A very important goal of your work in History 10/11 will be for you to gain the knowledge needed to assume the responsibilities of a "well-informed, globally aware, engaged world citizen." (Bronx Community College General Education Objectives, BCC 2005-2006 Catalog, p. 7.)

    Writing-Intensive Section (6203W) Only: This is a writing intensive (WI) course. A variety of writing assignments will help students master the course content while developing critical thinking, writing, and reading skills. There will be two formal essays, with an opportunity to submit rough drafts in advance for my feedback. In addition, there will be several low-stakes in-class writing exercises.

    Required Texts:
    Textbook: Finkelstein, The Modern World: A History, 4th Edition, Pearson (2009)
    Reader: Finkelstein, The Modern World: A History Reader, 1st Edition, Pearson (2008)
    Please bring BOTH books to class every day except the midterm.

    Tests:
    Testing will consist of a midterm examination and a final examination.
  • The midterm exam will consist of a chronology section, and an identifications section, and an essay, and will cover the period of study preceding the exam.
  • The final exam will consist of a chronology section, an identifications section, and an essay, and will cover the period of study between the midterm and the end of the semester.
    We will discuss the format and topics covered by each exam during the class just before each exam; the essay question choices will be provided in advance.

    Midterm Study Guide:
    Chronology Problem 1: Enlightenment and American Revolution (10%). Be prepared to place in order, from earliest to latest, Martin Luther's major action; the philosophers' writings from Syllabus Topic 1B; and these major events of the American Revolutionary Period: The French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Quartering Act, the Tea Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Intolerable Acts, the Declaration of Independence, the Revolutionary War, the ratification of the Constitution, and the invention of the cotton gin.
    Chron. Problem 2a: Industrialization Process (6%). Understand how subsistence agriculture gave way to the factory town. Problem 2b: National Industrialization (4%). Understand the order in which Britain, France, and Germany entered the industrial revolution.
    Chron. Problem 3: Revolutionary and Napoleonic France (10%). Be prepared to place in order, from earliest to latest, the major events of the French Revolution, the First Republic, and the Napoleonic Period.
    Identifications: Be prepared to answer the identification problems (5% each) from Syllabus Topics I (The Age of Revolution), II & III (Industrialization), IV (Nationalism), and V (Imperialism). I will give you three from each; you will choose two from each list of three.
    Essay: For 30%, answer one of the following questions: 1. How did the enlightenment lead to the American revolution? 2. What is the difference between societies with slaves and slave societies? 3. What is the problem with Napoleon rising on merit and then recreating the monarchy and nobility? No minimum length, but you must answer the question you choose with an introduction, body, and conclusion. I suggest you write a practice exam this weekend, and consider speaking with the Writing Fellow before the exam.

    Quiz and Exam Rules
    Please observe these rules carefully. Infraction will result in lost points.
  • No pencil or red ink.
  • Please clear your desks of all items except a writing implement prior to the start of the quiz or exam.
  • Keep your eyes on your own quiz or exam.
  • Write your name first; no extra time will be alloted at the end to write your name.
  • Do not speak during the quiz or exam. If you have a question, raise your hand and the instructor will come to your seat.
  • You may not leave the classroom during the quiz or exam. If you must leave for an emergency, turn in your quiz or exam; you're finished. So please handle biological functions in advance.
  • If you finish a quiz early, please wait quietly until I have called the time.
  • If you finish an exam early, you may leave. I begin grading exams as soon as the first student has finished; if you'd like to stay, it's possible I'll get to yours before the end of the class, so let me know if you're staying.

    Essays (Writing-Intensive Section 6203W ONLY):
    Submission Guidelines:
    All papers must be 5-7 pages in length (no less than 5 FULL pages and no more than 7), typed, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, 1 inch margins on all four sides, delivered as an e-mail attachment (Microsoft Word ONLY) to professor.golland@gmail.com by 11:59 p.m. on the appropriate due date. All writing paraphrased or quoted from sources other than the student's own imagination must be specifically cited in footnotes, to include all three of the following sources:
  • The textbook,
  • At least two sources from the Reader, and
  • Your notes from the classroom discussions.

    CITATIONS: In your footnotes or endnotes, cite the textbook as follows: "Andrea Finkelstein, The Modern World: A History, Fourth Edition (Pearson, 2009)." Cite the Reader passages as follows: "[author name], [passage title], in Andrea Finkelstein (Ed.), The Modern World: A History Reader (Pearson, 2008)." Cite classroom discussions as "David Golland (Prof.), HIS10-6203W, Bronx Community College/CUNY, [date of class]." The second and subsequent times you cite each of these sources, you may abbreviate the citations as follows: "Textbook p. [page number]," "Sourcebook p. [page number]," and "Golland class, [date]." You do not need to write a bibliography.

    OUTLINE and ROUGH DRAFT: All students must submit an outline (including a list of sources in proper citation format) and a rough draft of their complete essay. The due dates for these submissions appear below.

    PENALTIES:
  • 10 points off per day late, starting at exactly 12:00 a.m. on the first day after the due date.
  • 10 points of per page (or fraction of a page) short or long.
  • 5 points off for each formatting infraction (line spacing, font, margins).
  • 10 points off (each) for not citing the textbook, reader, or class discussions.
  • 5 points off for citing only one passage from the reader.
    Papers submitted in any format other than Microsoft Word will not be read. All e-mails will be confirmed in the order received, and not necessarily on the first, second, or even third school day after the due date. If I discover that your paper is in the wrong format when I open your e-mail, I will inform you that you can re-submit in the proper format, but you will be penalized a late penalty based on the due date, not on how long it takes you to respond to my confirmation. The bottom line: to minimize late penalties, turn in your paper as early as possible.

    TOPICS:
    First Essay: The principles of the Enlightenment continue to be discussed and debated three hundred years after the fact. How do these principles address such issues as religious fundamentalism, liberal capitalism, and/or personal liberty?

    Second Essay: Nationalism played an important role in the postwar era, both in terms of de-colonization and in the context of the Cold War. Discuss the importance of nationalism in de-colonization and the Cold War.

    DUE DATES:
    First Essay: Outline due March 22; rough draft due March 24, final draft due April 7.
    Second Essay: Outline due May 3; rough draft due May 5, final draft due May 12.

    Grade Weighting:
    Non-Writing Intensive Sections (6205, 6207, and 2224)
    Participation: 25%
    Occasional Homework Quizzes: 15%
    Midterm Examination: 30%
    Final Examination: 30%

    Writing Intensive Section (6203W)
    Participation: 25%
    Occasional Homework Quizzes: 10%
    First Essay: 12%
    Second Essay: 13%
    Midterm Examination: 20%
    Final Examination: 20%


    The mathematical scores will strictly translate into letter grades as follows:
    98 or higher: A+
    93 or higher: A
    90 or higher: A-
    88 or higher: B+
    83 or higher: B
    80 or higher: B-
    78 or higher: C+
    70 or higher: C
    60 or higher: D
    Less than 60: F

    "Bump-ups:"
    Some students will receive a grade one notch higher than that dictated by their mathematical score. For instance, a high F (above 57) could become a D-; a D- could become a D; a D could become a D+; etc. There are two ways in which a student can earn a "Bump-up."
  • "Bump-Up" for Improvement: Students who score at least ten points higher on the final than on the midterm.
  • "Bump-Up" for Standard Deviation: Students who earn a grade on one component of the course which is at least 20 points lower than their grades on all other components of the course.

    Please note that these "Bump-ups" are the ONLY exceptions. All other students will receive the exact grade they have earned. As an example, a student with a mathematical score of 89.999 who does not qualify for a "Bump-up" will receive a B+; a student with a mathematical score of 59.999 who does not qualify for a "Bump-up" will receive an F.

    Students who fail both the midterm and the final examination will fail the course regardless of their mathematical score and are not eligible for "Bump-ups."

    Classroom Etiquette:
  • Cellphones and other electronic devices: For the sake of your fellow students, please remember to silence your phones and pagers. Each time your phone rings during the class may result in as much as one point off your final grade--at my discretion. Please notify me if you are an emergency services worker on call while off-duty.
  • Eating and Drinking: As long as you clean up after yourself, I have no problem with eating or drinking in the classroom. It should go without saying that "drinking" refers to non-alcoholic beverages.
  • You will be treated like an adult, so you are expected to behave like an adult. When class has started, you are expected to be attentive to the lesson. You don't need permission to leave the room, just do it. But you have a responsibility to arrive in class on time and not leave class more than absolutely necessary.
  • Dismissal Distractions: Packing up or otherwise making noise prior to my dismissal of the class is an unnecessary distraction both to me and your fellow students. Accordingly, each time you do so may result in as much as one point off your final grade--also at my discretion. Please notify me in advance if you need to leave early for any reason.

    Absence Policy:
  • Students who are absent five or more times will automatically fail the course.
  • No students will be retroactively excused from the midterm examination for any reason other than an emergency, which must be documented. Students who know in advance that they will need to miss the midterm may inform me and have the documentation requirement waived. All makeup midterms, whether arranged in advance or due to a documented emergency, will carry a penalty.
  • Students who otherwise succesfully complete the course but fail to attend the final examination will receive a grade of ABS (absent from final) and will be required to attend a makeup examination during the following semester. Failure to attend the makeup final exam will result in immediate failure of the course.
  • Students who are absent from the final examination but would have failed the course based on pre-final exam performance will not receive a grade of ABS but will automatically fail the course. Such students who also were absent for the preceding seven class sessions will receive a grade of WU, or "Withdrawn Unofficially," which is the equivalent of a grade of F.

    Schedule of Assignments:
    Tuesday/Thursday HIS 10 Section 6205
    Monday/Wednesday HIS 11 Sections 2224 & 6207
    Monday/Wednesday HIS 10 Section 6203W (Writing-Intensive)
    Saturday HIS 10 Section 8583

    Tuesday/Thursday HIS 10 Section 6205:
    January 28: Introduction, distribution of Day One Handout and take-home assignment
    February 2: I.A-C
    February 4: I.D-E
    February 9: II.A
    February 11: II.B
    February 16: III.A
    February 18: No class (classes follow a Monday schedule)
    February 23: III.B
    February 25: IV.A-c
    March 2: IV.D-E
    March 4: V.A-B
    March 9: Text pp. 105-115; Reader Docs. #42-47; Topic V. IDs #5-6.
    March 11: Text pp. 86-88 & 123-130; Reader Docs. #51-55; Topic VI. IDs #1-3.
    March 16: Catch up/Prepare for Midterm
    March 18: Midterm Examination
    March 23: Class cancelled
    March 25: Text pp. 63 & 147-162; Reader Docs. #62-63 & 66-68; Topic VII. IDs #1-2 & 4-6.
    March 30 and April 1: Spring break (no classes)
    April 6: Text pp. 177-185; Reader Doc. #79; Topic VIII. IDs #1-2.
    April 8: Text pp. 185-199; Reader Docs. #81-82; Topic VIII. IDs #4-7.
    April 13: Text pp. 207-210; Reader Docs. #84-85; Topic IX. IDs #1-2.
    April 15: Text pp. 210-230; Reader Docs. #86-91; Topic IX. IDs #3-6.
    April 20: Text pp. 239-244; Reader Docs. #94-95 & 97; Topic X. IDs #1-2.
    April 22: Text pp. 244-259; Reader Docs. #99-100 & 108; Topic X. IDs #3-5.
    April 27: Class cancelled
    April 29: Text pp. 269-276 & 284-294; Reader Docs. #75 & 109; Topic X. IDs #1 & 5-6.
    May 4: Text pp. 321-330; Reader Doc. #115; No IDs due today.
    May 6: Text pp. 330-339; Reader Docs. #38 & 116; Topic XII. IDs #5-6.
    May 11: Text pp. 343-359; Reader Docs. #120-126 & 128; Topic XIII. IDs #1-5.
    May 13: Open extended office hours.*
    Final Exam: Date, time, and location TBA


    Monday/Wednesday HIS 11 Sections 2224 & 6207:
    February 1: Introduction, distribution of Day One Handout and take-home assignment
    February 3: I.A-C
    February 8: I.D-E
    February 10: II.A
    February 15: Presidents' Day; No Classes
    February 17: II.B
    February 18: III.A (classes follow a Monday schedule)
    February 22: III.B
    February 24: IV.A-c
    March 1: IV.D-E
    March 3: V.A-B
    March 8: Text pp. 105-115; Reader Docs. #42-47; Topic V. IDs #5-6.
    March 10: Text pp. 86-88 & 123-130; Reader Docs. #51-55; Topic VI. IDs #1-3.
    March 15: Catch up/Prepare for Midterm
    March 17: Midterm Examination
    March 22: Text pp. 63 & 147-151; Reader Doc. #62; Topic VII. IDs #1-2.
    March 24: Text pp. 151-162; Reader Docs. #63 & 66-68; Topic VII. IDs #4-6.
    March 29 and 31 and April 5: Spring break (no classes)
    April 7: Text pp. 177-185; Reader Doc. #79; Topic VIII. IDs #1-2.
    April 12: Text pp. 185-199; Reader Docs. #81-82; Topic VIII. IDs #4-7.
    April 14: Text pp. 207-210; Reader Docs. #84-85; Topic IX. IDs #1-2.
    April 19: Text pp. 210-230; Reader Docs. #86-91; Topic IX. IDs #3-6.
    April 21: Text pp. 239-244; Reader Docs. #94-95 & 97; Topic X. IDs #1-2.
    April 26: Text pp. 244-259; Reader Docs. #99-100 & 108; Topic X. IDs #3-5.
    April 28: Text pp. 269-276; Reader Doc. #75; Topic XI. ID #1.
    May 3: Text pp. 284-294; Reader Doc. #109; Topic XI. IDs #5-6.
    May 5: Text pp. 321-330; Reader Doc. #115; No IDs due today.
    May 10: Text pp. 330-339; Reader Docs. #38 & 116; Topic XII. IDs #5-6.
    May 12: Text pp. 343-359; Reader Docs. #120-126 & 128; Topic XIII. IDs #1-5.
    May 17: Open extended office hours.*
    Final Exam, Section 2224: Friday, May 21, 10:00 a.m. Rm. CO 615.
    Final Exam, Section 6207: Monday, May 24, 6:00 p.m. Rm. CO 228.


    Monday/Wednesday HIS 10 Section 6203W (Writing-Intensive):
    February 1: Introduction, distribution of Day One Handout and take-home assignment
    February 3: I.A-C
    February 8: I.D-E
    February 10: II.A
    February 15: Presidents' Day; No Classes
    February 17: II.B
    February 18: III.A (classes follow a Monday schedule)
    February 22: III.B
    February 24: IV.A-c
    March 1: IV.D-E
    March 3: V.A-B
    March 8: V.C-D
    March 8: Text pp. 105-115; Reader Docs. #42-47; Topic V. IDs #5-6.
    March 10: Text pp. 86-88 & 123-130; Reader Docs. #51-55; Topic VI. IDs #1-3.
    March 15: Catch up/Prepare for Midterm
    March 17: Midterm Examination
    March 22: Text pp. 63 & 147-151; Reader Doc. #62; Topic VII. IDs #1-2; Outline and Citations of First Paper Due.
    March 24: Text pp. 151-162; Reader Docs. #63 & 66-68; Topic VII. IDs #4-6; Rough Draft of First Paper Due.
    March 29 and 31 and April 5: Spring break (no classes)
    April 7: Text pp. 177-185; Reader Doc. #79; Topic VIII. IDs #1-2; First Paper Due.
    April 12: Text pp. 185-199; Reader Docs. #81-82; Topic VIII. IDs #4-7.
    April 14: Text pp. 207-210; Reader Docs. #84-85; Topic IX. IDs #1-2.
    April 19: Text pp. 210-230; Reader Docs. #86-91; Topic IX. IDs #3-6.
    April 21: Text pp. 239-244; Reader Docs. #94-95 & 97; Topic X. IDs #1-2.
    April 26: Text pp. 244-259; Reader Docs. #99-100 & 108; Topic X. IDs #3-5.
    April 28: Text pp. 269-276; Reader Doc. #75; Topic XI. ID #1.
    May 3: Text pp. 284-294; Reader Doc. #109; Topic XI. IDs #5-6; Outline and Citations of Second Paper Due.
    May 5: Text pp. 321-330; Reader Doc. #115; No IDs due today; Rough Draft of Second Paper Due.
    May 10: Text pp. 330-339; Reader Docs. #38 & 116; Topic XII. IDs #5-6.
    May 12: Text pp. 343-359; Reader Docs. #120-126 & 128; Topic XIII. IDs #1-5; Second Paper Due.
    May 17: Open extended office hours.*
    Final Exam: Monday, May 24, 8:00 p.m. Rm. CO 213.


    Saturday HIS 10 Section 8583:
    March 27: Text pp. 63 & 147-162; Reader Docs. #62-63 & 66-68; Topic VII. IDs #1-2 & 4-6.
    April 10: Text pp. 177-199; Reader Doc. #79, 81-82; Topic VIII. IDs #1-2, 4-7.
    April 17: Text pp. 207-230; Reader Docs. #84-91; Topic IX. IDs #1-6.
    April 24: Text pp. 239-259; Reader Docs. #94-95, 97, 99-100 & 108; Topic X. IDs #1-5.
    May 1: Text pp. 269-276 & 284-294; Reader Docs. #75 & 109; Topic X. IDs #1 & 5-6.
    May 8: Text pp. 321-339; Reader Docs. #38 & 115-116; Topic XII. IDs #5-6.
    May 15:Open extended office hours.* Text pp. 343-359; Reader Docs. #120-126 & 128; Topic XIII.
    Final Exam: Saturday, May 22, 12:00 p.m. Rm. CO 330.

    *During "open extended office hours" (Thursday, May 13, Saturday, May 15, and Monday, May 17), formal class will not be held. Professor Golland will be available to students in his office during normal class time. No appointment is necessary.

    Contact Information:
    Professor David Hamilton Golland
    Department of History
    Bronx Community College
    Office Location: CO-343.
    Office Hours: E-mail for an appointment.
    E-mail: professor.golland@gmail.com

    Links:
  • BCC Homepage
  • BCC History Department
  • BCC Library
  • CUNY+
  • New York Public Library
  • The New York Times Online
  • Amazon.Com
  • Barnes & Noble
  • MTA Information
  • Mapquest
  • Google
  • Hotmail
  • Professor Golland's Personal Homepage

    Disclaimer: None of the above shall be construed to supercede Bronx Community College/CUNY policy or local, state, or federal laws. Any instructions or information on this website found to be in violation of said policies or laws can and should be ignored.

    Last Updated 20 May, 2010 (DHG)